February 15th, 2013
pejmanyousefzadeh

kqedscience:

Watch Asteroid Flyby Live Today

You can breathe a sigh of relief around lunchtime today, when an asteroid the size of a 15-story building passes close to Earth. The encounter will be the closest ever recorded by scientists for a rock of this size.

The asteroid, known as 2012 DA14, will come within 17,000 miles of the planet. That’s much closer than the moon and even inside the ring of geosynchronous weather and communication satellites. Today at 11:24am PST, it will whiz by at roughly eight times the speed of a bullet.

It won’t be dark enough to see the asteroid from California during the day, but here’s how to watch it.

  • NASA will stream a feed of the asteroid from a telescope at the Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama from 6pm to 9pm PST.
  • See it through the telescope at Chabot Space & Science Center beginning at 7:30pm (weather permitting).
  • Watch below beginning at 11am PST Friday

Good thing that it will only pass by. If it hit us … well … watch.

And that’s just a meteorite.

Reblogged from KQEDScience
January 13th, 2013
pejmanyousefzadeh

Your Good News Post of the Day

We won’t be killed by a giant asteroid in 2036.

Among the benefits of avoiding Apophis is that my beloved Chicago Cubs will have more time to win a World Series. And Heaven knows they will need it.

January 3rd, 2013
pejmanyousefzadeh

smithsonianmag:

Never-Before-Seen Stage of Planet Birth Revealed

Astronomers studying a newborn star have caught a detailed glimpse of planets forming around it, revealing a never-before seen stage of planetary evolution.

Large gas giant planets appear to be clearing a gap in the disk of material surrounding the star, and using gravity to channel material across the gap to the interior, helping the star to grow. Theoretical simulations have predicted such bridges between outer and inner portions of disks surrounding stars, but none have been directly observed until now. - Continue reading at Live Science.

Photo by: ALMA (ESO/NAOJ/NRAO)/M.Kornmesser (ESO)

Ed note: This newly discovered Earth-like planet could be habitable.

Reblogged from Smithsonian Magazine
November 19th, 2012
pejmanyousefzadeh

discoverynews:

n-a-s-a:

Leonids Over Monument Valley Image

Credit & Copyright: Sean M. Sabatini 

Beautiful!

Reblogged from DiscoveryNews
November 18th, 2012
pejmanyousefzadeh

jtotheizzoe:

What would happen if an meteor or asteroid the size of ______________, made of ______________, hit Earth at a speed of ______________? 

There’s a web app for that. Check out Purdue’s Impact: Earth!

Have fun destroying the planet!!! (And learning about asteroid impacts of various sizes and energies, of course)

Well, this will give you nightmares.

Reblogged from It's Okay To Be Smart
November 15th, 2012
pejmanyousefzadeh
huffingtonpost:

parislemon:

thedailywhat:

Space Shot of the Day: 100,000 Stars
If you’re running on Chrome browser, check out Google’s latest Experiment project that visualizes the precise location of at least 100,000 stars in our Milky Way galaxy, using various imagery and data pulled from NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). For your frame of reference, there are approximately 200 to 400 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy.

Pretty awesome, but only works in Chrome.

We are all obsessed with this site. 

huffingtonpost:

parislemon:

thedailywhat:

Space Shot of the Day: 100,000 Stars

If you’re running on Chrome browser, check out Google’s latest Experiment project that visualizes the precise location of at least 100,000 stars in our Milky Way galaxy, using various imagery and data pulled from NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA). For your frame of reference, there are approximately 200 to 400 billion stars in the Milky Way galaxy.

Pretty awesome, but only works in Chrome.

We are all obsessed with this site. 

(Source: chrome.blogspot.com)

Reblogged from Politico
November 8th, 2012
pejmanyousefzadeh

jtotheizzoe:

The Universe Is Almost Done Making Stars

Looks like the cosmos may now be about as stellar as it’s going to get. The rate of new star formation has slowed considerably over the past few billion years, and the universe, like a Florida winter, is now dominated by the old and decaying.

How researchers figured this out is especially cool. 

The picture up top there is from the Hubble telescope’s Extreme Deep Field (XDF) survey. That’s not how they did it. But the XDF is the sum of almost 10 years of Hubble exposures that peer back 13.2 billion years into the universe’s history. The universe itself is only about 13.7 billion years old (the time since the Big Bang). The oldest stars and galaxies in the XDF are 13.2 billion light years away, which means we are looking at the universe as it was 13.2 billion years ago.

The new study took pictures of the universe 2, 4, 6 and 9 billion years ago, and discovered that more than half of our stars are more than 9 billion years old. And the sooner to “now” that you look, the fewer new stars you see.

Popular Science has some more info about this sobering tale of star birth. Looks like the universe is more a place of decay these days than it is creation. Hurry! Go look at the stars while you can! We only have several billion years before they burn out!!

Reblogged from It's Okay To Be Smart
November 8th, 2012
pejmanyousefzadeh

discoverynews:

Super-Earth Discovered in Star’s Habitable Zone

The family of planets circling a relatively close dwarf star has grown to six, including a potential rocky world at least seven times more massive than Earth that is properly located for liquid water to exist on its surface, a condition believed to be necessary for life.

One thing’s for sure, gravity on that planet will suck.

Reblogged from DiscoveryNews
November 6th, 2012
pejmanyousefzadeh
Reblogged from It's Okay To Be Smart
November 6th, 2012
pejmanyousefzadeh

jtotheizzoe:

DC Comics and Neil deGrasse Tyson Have Found Krypton

Making a special guest appearance in Action Comics #14 this week, Neil deGrasse Tyson has found the location of the star around which Superman’s home planet Krypton orbited. I say orbited, because Krypton was destroyed just after Superman left home. 

The star is called LHS 2520, a dim red dwarf that’s invisible without a telescope. Dr. Tyson was given some background info by DC Comics and chose that as Superman’s sun, about 27 light-years away.

Wait a second … Superman’s about 27 years old, he travels pretty fast, and the planet’s around 27 light years away … I wonder what they’ll see when he and Dr. Tyson look through the telescope?

The book comes out tomorrow, Nov. 7! Looks like we’ve got two badasses over here.

Phil Plait has more Krypton science at Bad Astronomy.

Reblogged from It's Okay To Be Smart
October 31st, 2012
pejmanyousefzadeh

jtotheizzoe:

Phobos: Doomed Moon of Mars

This is Phobos, one of the two moons of Mars, and it’s living on borrowed time. It is thought to be perhaps a captured asteroid, sucked in by Mars’ gravity, and its pock-marked surface is scarred with craters thanks to debris ejected from its home planet’s own collisions with meteors and the like over the years.

But Phobos won’t be around forever. Unlike our own Moon, which orbits at a safe distance of several hundred thousand kilometers (and will one day be “tidally locked” to Earth), Phobos is less than 6,000 km from Mars. This causes extreme tidal forces, stretching Phobos like saltwater taffy made of solid rock. Eventually, perhaps a million years from now, it will crumble into a ring of debris, with that ring later decaying into an orbital rainstorm of rocky meteoric fireballs.

That’s pretty cool. Mars will eat its own moon one day, in a spectacular show of orbital destruction, and I’m sorry we won’t be around to watch.

(via APOD)

Reblogged from It's Okay To Be Smart
October 17th, 2012
pejmanyousefzadeh
guardian:

How a planet orbiting Alpha Centauri B might look. Scientists claim to have discovered an Earth-like planet there a mere 25 trillion miles away. 
Photograph: L Calcada/AP

guardian:

How a planet orbiting Alpha Centauri B might look. Scientists claim to have discovered an Earth-like planet there a mere 25 trillion miles away.

Photograph: L Calcada/AP

Reblogged from The Guardian
October 11th, 2012
pejmanyousefzadeh
breakingnews:

Astronomers discover planet bigger than Earth, made of diamond
Reuters: Astronomers have discovered a planet twice the size of Earth made largely out of diamond. The planet, called ‘55 Cancri e,’ orbits a sun-like star in the constellation of Cancer. Discovered by a US-Franco research team, its radius is twice that of Earth’s. It is also much more dense with a mass 8 times greater.
A study estimates that at least a third of the planet’s mass, the equivalent of approximately 3 Earth masses, could be diamond.
Photo: The planet ‘55 Cancri e’ is seen in an undated artist’s conception. (via Reuters/NASA)

breakingnews:

Astronomers discover planet bigger than Earth, made of diamond

Reuters: Astronomers have discovered a planet twice the size of Earth made largely out of diamond. The planet, called ‘55 Cancri e,’ orbits a sun-like star in the constellation of Cancer. Discovered by a US-Franco research team, its radius is twice that of Earth’s. It is also much more dense with a mass 8 times greater.

A study estimates that at least a third of the planet’s mass, the equivalent of approximately 3 Earth masses, could be diamond.


Photo: The planet ‘55 Cancri e’ is seen in an undated artist’s conception. (via Reuters/NASA)

Reblogged from Breaking News
October 10th, 2012
pejmanyousefzadeh

jtotheizzoe:

explore-blog:

Ur-astronomer Ptolemy marvels at the poetry of the cosmos in the margins of a book in the second century CE. Nearly two millennia later, Neil deGrasse Tyson does the same, on the heels of Carl Sagan.

You tell ‘em, Ptolemy.

(Source: explore-blog)

Reblogged from It's Okay To Be Smart

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