April 1st, 2013
pejmanyousefzadeh
laphamsquarterly:


In our sundown perambulations of late through the outer parts of Brooklyn, we have observed several parties of youngsters playing “base,” a certain game of ball. We wish such sights were more common among us. In the practice of athletic and manly sports, the young men of nearly all our American cities are very deficient—perhaps more so than those of any other country that could be mentioned. Clerks are shut up from early morning till nine or ten o’clock at night—apprentices, after their days’ works, either go to bed or lounge about in places where they benefit neither body nor mind—and all classes seem to act as though there were no commendable objects of pursuit in the world except making money and tenaciously sticking to one’s trade or occupation. Now, as the fault is so generally of this kind, we can do little harm in hinting to people that, after all, there may be no necessity for such a drudge system among men. Let us enjoy life a little. Has God made this beautiful earth—the sun to shine—all the sweet influences of nature to operate and planted in man a wish for their delights—and all for nothing? Let us leave our close rooms and the dust and corruption of stagnant places, and taste some of the good things Providence has scattered around so liberally.

Walt Whitman, from the Sports and Games issue of Lapham’s Quarterly.

laphamsquarterly:

In our sundown perambulations of late through the outer parts of Brooklyn, we have observed several parties of youngsters playing “base,” a certain game of ball. We wish such sights were more common among us. In the practice of athletic and manly sports, the young men of nearly all our American cities are very deficient—perhaps more so than those of any other country that could be mentioned. Clerks are shut up from early morning till nine or ten o’clock at night—apprentices, after their days’ works, either go to bed or lounge about in places where they benefit neither body nor mind—and all classes seem to act as though there were no commendable objects of pursuit in the world except making money and tenaciously sticking to one’s trade or occupation. Now, as the fault is so generally of this kind, we can do little harm in hinting to people that, after all, there may be no necessity for such a drudge system among men. Let us enjoy life a little. Has God made this beautiful earth—the sun to shine—all the sweet influences of nature to operate and planted in man a wish for their delights—and all for nothing? Let us leave our close rooms and the dust and corruption of stagnant places, and taste some of the good things Providence has scattered around so liberally.

Walt Whitman, from the Sports and Games issue of Lapham’s Quarterly.

Reblogged from Lapham's Quarterly
January 13th, 2013
pejmanyousefzadeh

Your Good News Post of the Day

We won’t be killed by a giant asteroid in 2036.

Among the benefits of avoiding Apophis is that my beloved Chicago Cubs will have more time to win a World Series. And Heaven knows they will need it.

October 4th, 2012
pejmanyousefzadeh

thedailyfeed:

Babe Ruth never did it. Neither did Hank Aaron or Willie Mays. Joe DiMaggio came close, once.

Detroit Tigers slugger Miguel Cabrera has accomplished what some of the greatest players in baseball history could not: He has won the triple crown.

Cabrera topped the American League in batting average (.330), home runs (44) and runs batted in (139) for the season — a statistical trifecta last achieved by Boston’s Carl Yastrzemski in 1967. The regular season wrapped up last night; Cabrera’s Tigers start the playoffs Saturday.

Only 14 players in baseball history have pulled off the triple crown, the first being Paul Aloysius Hines for the Providence Grays in 1878. Since then, even the greatest players have swung and missed.

Reblogged from The Daily
April 5th, 2012
pejmanyousefzadeh
Go Microbes … er, Cubs!
uchicagoadmissions:

Cubs Opening Day! 
Head up to Wrigleyville for sun, hot-dogs (no ketchup! You’re in Chicago) and some home-runs in their game against the Washington Nationals. 
Also, did you know…they used to be called the Chicago Microbes?

Go Microbes … er, Cubs!

uchicagoadmissions:

Cubs Opening Day!

Head up to Wrigleyville for sun, hot-dogs (no ketchup! You’re in Chicago) and some home-runs in their game against the Washington Nationals. 

Also, did you know…they used to be called the Chicago Microbes?

March 20th, 2012
pejmanyousefzadeh

nprfreshair:

calumet412:

Center field at Wrigley on game day, c.1962, Chicago.

It is spring.

(Source: calumet412)

Reblogged from NPR Fresh Air

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