June 6th, 2013
pejmanyousefzadeh
uchicagoadmissions:

gapers:

absurdlakefront:

Sometimes I really want falafel, and sometimes the best falafel option nearby is in the back of a jewelry store on Wabash.

The lentil soup is delicious.

Places like these are one of the many reasons we love Chicago. 

I have been here many a time.

uchicagoadmissions:

gapers:

absurdlakefront:

Sometimes I really want falafel, and sometimes the best falafel option nearby is in the back of a jewelry store on Wabash.

The lentil soup is delicious.

Places like these are one of the many reasons we love Chicago. 

I have been here many a time.

March 21st, 2013
pejmanyousefzadeh

Restaurant Protectionism

For DC residents: You should be really angry at your city government. It is trying to restrict your dining choices by working as hard as it can to put food trucks out of business. And why? Because traditional restaurants can’t stand to have competition from food trucks.

For advocates of big government: When you wonder why people like me cast a wary eye on the enlargement of government’s scope and power, remember stories like this one.

March 16th, 2013
pejmanyousefzadeh

Internet Access in North Korea

As with anything involving the Hermit Kingdom, there is a great deal of craziness attached to this issue. Prepare to be smacked by gob as a consequence of reading the following:

  • As the article’s title indicates, at the most, a grand total of 1,000 people would be affected by a cyber blackout in North Korea. And perhaps the number of people in the country with “unrestricted access” numbers only “a few dozen families — most directly related to Kim Jong-un himself.”
  • North Korea’s mobile Internet service does not cover people who actually live in North Korea.
  • North Korea’s intranet prevents the country’s citizens from getting anything resembling an honest glimpse of the World Wide Web—and of the larger world, to boot. Additionally, if you are a journalist and there is but a small typo in your article, you can be sent to a “revolutionisation” camp. I’m pretty sure the experience is less lovely than it sounds, and the experience doesn’t sound all that lovely to begin with.

Other than the foregoing, of course, we can bet our bottom dollars that everything is fine in North Korea, and everyone living there thanks his/her lucky stars on an hourly basis for the good fortune that placed them on the septentrional side of the 38th parallel. I mean, who would want to live with those pesky South Koreans and their significantly larger number of political liberties, their wealth, their much higher standard of living, and their plentiful food options—options which don’t involve eating grass and/or cannibalism?

February 23rd, 2013
pejmanyousefzadeh

Repeat After Me: “Biotech Crops DON’T Post a Health/Safety/Environmental Risk”

And anyone who tells you otherwise is (a) lying; or (b) incredibly misinformed. Also, (c) if their lies/misinformation are accepted as true, the resulting lack of biotech crops will cause millions to starve to death.

Incidentally, it is worth noting that the people who denigrate biotech crops and GMOs are overwhelmingly found on the port side of the partisan divide. Their war against biotech crops/GMOs should be termed a war on science, and would be if the people waging that war were Republicans instead.

February 5th, 2013
pejmanyousefzadeh

Decadence Can Be Delicious

Joe Weisenthal ate a $140 hamburger which he really liked. Here’s what went into the making of the burger:

The db Burger was created by Chef Daniel Boulud prior to db Bistro Moderne’s June 2001 opening. The impetus came from a journalist asking Daniel to comment on the rioting of French farmers directed at McDonald’s locations in France.* “The French are just jealous they did not invent the hamburger themselves” Daniel responded. Inspired by the topic, the chef went on to invent a burger of his own, combining the best of French and American cuisine. The result is the now famous db burger. Its delectable stuffing is based on the short ribs braised in red wine that are a signature dish on the menu at DANIEL. The renowned burger is offered exclusively at db Bistro Moderne, at the restaurant’s locations in in New York City, Miami and Singapore. The db burger is actually a combination of two dishes: on the outside a classic ground sirloin burger, and on the inside a stuffing of tender red wine braised short ribs (off the bone), foie gras, a mirepoix of root vegetables and preserved black truffle. The homemade toasted parmesan and poppy seed bun is spread with a touch of fresh horseradish, oven roasted tomato confit, fresh tomato, red onions and frisée lettuce.

The db Burger “Royale” features the addition of fresh black truffle and a truffle dressing. The “Royale” version was launched in January 2003, with the arrival of black truffle season. Black truffle has always been a key ingredient in the burger’s rich stuffing, making the dish a perfect vehicle for slices of this decadent, intensely flavored extravagance. You can choose to have several ethereal slices of fresh black truffle cover the DB Burger “Royale”, but only during the black truffle season. With fresh black Perigord truffles commanding as much as $800 or more per pound, a burger laden with them is a luxury. The “Royale version of the burger is market priced, according to the seasonal market price of fresh black truffle. It is served exclusively during black truffle season, which usually runs from late December through late March.

A third of the burger “was basically a complete meal.” Never have leftovers sounded so tasty.

February 4th, 2013
pejmanyousefzadeh
uchicagoadmissions:

Harold’s Chicken Shack highlighted in Food and Wine magazine, for some reason
OK, actually, we’re super proud that Harold’s was noted the 5th best fried chicken in the US-- we’re just surprised that someone from Food and Wine actually went there. Our chickeny home on 53rd street also claims to serve fish, pizza, and videos; we prefer a half-white meat, salt and pepper, with a side order of Space Jam on VHS. How do you take your Harold’s?

I am not in the least bit surprised by this. I think that Harold’s is one of the best dining establishments in the entire city of Chicago. Sure, eating there regularly will reduce your life expectancy by a quarter of a century, but you’ve got to be willing to give a little in order to get a lot, no?
And now, I have a craving …

uchicagoadmissions:

Harold’s Chicken Shack highlighted in Food and Wine magazine, for some reason

OK, actually, we’re super proud that Harold’s was noted the 5th best fried chicken in the US-- we’re just surprised that someone from Food and Wine actually went there. Our chickeny home on 53rd street also claims to serve fish, pizza, and videos; we prefer a half-white meat, salt and pepper, with a side order of Space Jam on VHS. How do you take your Harold’s?

I am not in the least bit surprised by this. I think that Harold’s is one of the best dining establishments in the entire city of Chicago. Sure, eating there regularly will reduce your life expectancy by a quarter of a century, but you’ve got to be willing to give a little in order to get a lot, no?

And now, I have a craving …

January 13th, 2013
pejmanyousefzadeh

"No Death Star for You!"

I am tremendously disappointed. The White House has announced that the federal government will not build a Death Star.

I certainly want to give props to Paul Shawcross for the informative, humorous and fun-loving way in which he wrote his response, but from a Keynesian standpoint, the arguments he makes are surely inadequate. Shawcross cites the massive price tag associated with building a Death Star, but according to Keynesian principles, we ought to worry much less about the deficit these days, and more about throwing piles of money into job-creating enterprises. Building a Death Star, as I explained in my post discussing the petition, should build oodles of jobs according to Keynesian theory, and Keynesians ought to be outraged that this administration is failing to take the principles spelled out in the General Theory of Employment to the next level. Indeed, I daresay that Keynesians ought to find the administration’s lack of faith in their principles disturbing.

Shawcross appears to be repelled by the idea of building a massive space station that is capable of blowing up planets, but of course, there is no reason why the Death Star should be tasked to blow up planets. Recall Paul Krugman’s comment that we ought to organize our public works plans as though we are supposed to respond to a fake alien invasion. Emphasis on the word “fake.” There can be no bigger, better or more comprehensive response to a fake alien invasion than to build a Death Star and since (one hopes) there are no actual aliens on their way to attack us, there is no need whatsoever to equip the Death Star with the ability to destroy planets.

Shawcross also states that the Obama administration does not want to build a Death Star “with a fundamental flaw that can be exploited by a one-man starship.” I applaud this sentiment, but of course, we don’t have to do any such thing. From a design perspective, the Death Star can be improved upon, and blithely assuming otherwise just will not do. Besides, in addition to all of the jobs that can be created by building a Death Star in the first place, we can create even more by employing more scientists and engineers to come up with a design that removes the flaw Shawcross refers to, and which I referred to in my original post regarding this issue.

(I suppose it would be nitpicky for me to reply to Shawcross’s observation that “the United States doesn’t have anything that can do the Kessel Run in less than 12 parsecs” by noting—as many, many, many others have—that a parsec is a unit of distance, not a unit of time. I know that George Lucas got this wrong too, but we expect better from the Obama administration. After all, we pay their salaries with our tax money.)

In any event, now that the administration has come out against the construction of a Death Star, I propose that we get private enterprise involved to construct it. I look forward to the day when we can point with pride to the creation of the Death Star, and then tell the Obama administration that they didn’t build that; someone else made that happen.

Incidentally, I am partial to this Death Star above all others. But then, I am no Keynesian.

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