June 13th, 2013
pejmanyousefzadeh

chicagobusiness:

Check out the skyline tonight: Chicago’s famous buildings are showing their Blackhawks pride for the Stanley Cup Final. Go Hawks!

Go Hawks!

April 21st, 2013
pejmanyousefzadeh

In Memoriam: Robert Byrne

Obituary here. As it indicates, Byrne was notable for his late foray into the world of professional chess—having taught philosophy beforehand—and for acquitting himself quite impressively even while losing to the great Bobby Fischer. His attempts to explain chess to the public at large should also not go unnoticed, even if his columns might have been hard to follow for those who did not know the game as well as he did.

Requiescat in pace.

April 1st, 2013
pejmanyousefzadeh
laphamsquarterly:


In our sundown perambulations of late through the outer parts of Brooklyn, we have observed several parties of youngsters playing “base,” a certain game of ball. We wish such sights were more common among us. In the practice of athletic and manly sports, the young men of nearly all our American cities are very deficient—perhaps more so than those of any other country that could be mentioned. Clerks are shut up from early morning till nine or ten o’clock at night—apprentices, after their days’ works, either go to bed or lounge about in places where they benefit neither body nor mind—and all classes seem to act as though there were no commendable objects of pursuit in the world except making money and tenaciously sticking to one’s trade or occupation. Now, as the fault is so generally of this kind, we can do little harm in hinting to people that, after all, there may be no necessity for such a drudge system among men. Let us enjoy life a little. Has God made this beautiful earth—the sun to shine—all the sweet influences of nature to operate and planted in man a wish for their delights—and all for nothing? Let us leave our close rooms and the dust and corruption of stagnant places, and taste some of the good things Providence has scattered around so liberally.

Walt Whitman, from the Sports and Games issue of Lapham’s Quarterly.

laphamsquarterly:

In our sundown perambulations of late through the outer parts of Brooklyn, we have observed several parties of youngsters playing “base,” a certain game of ball. We wish such sights were more common among us. In the practice of athletic and manly sports, the young men of nearly all our American cities are very deficient—perhaps more so than those of any other country that could be mentioned. Clerks are shut up from early morning till nine or ten o’clock at night—apprentices, after their days’ works, either go to bed or lounge about in places where they benefit neither body nor mind—and all classes seem to act as though there were no commendable objects of pursuit in the world except making money and tenaciously sticking to one’s trade or occupation. Now, as the fault is so generally of this kind, we can do little harm in hinting to people that, after all, there may be no necessity for such a drudge system among men. Let us enjoy life a little. Has God made this beautiful earth—the sun to shine—all the sweet influences of nature to operate and planted in man a wish for their delights—and all for nothing? Let us leave our close rooms and the dust and corruption of stagnant places, and taste some of the good things Providence has scattered around so liberally.

Walt Whitman, from the Sports and Games issue of Lapham’s Quarterly.

Reblogged from Lapham's Quarterly
February 5th, 2013
pejmanyousefzadeh

Ezra Klein and I Don’t Agree on Much …

But we do seem to agree—at least somewhat—on how to reduce the number and severity of concussions in the NFL:

“If you want to prevent concussions,” said former Steelers receiver Hines Ward, “take the helmet off: Play old-school football with the leather helmets, no facemask. When you put a helmet on you’re going to use it as a weapon, just like you use shoulder pads as a weapon.”

In other words, don’t evolve. Devolve. Go back to the beginning of the ad. But early in the ad, you can see the sidelines. There’s almost no one there. “It didn’t look like much,” the announcer said. It’s only late in the ad, when the field is full of armored gladiators jackknifing over one another, that the stands are full. No one wants to watch a game that doesn’t look like much.

I don’t think that it would be too difficult to fill the stands if the game devolved in the manner that Ward calls for, and there is no showing that the stands were empty because of the type of protective equipment used in the past by NFL players. Let’s remember the main reason why the stands weren’t filled in the NFL’s youth: The NFL had a very small fan base in its infancy with many doubting that the league would exist for the long haul. College football was king back in the day, and college football had no problem filling the stands despite the fact that the players used the same protective equipment that NFL players used. Additionally, there is no reason why the game wouldn’t “look like much” if it devolved. It certainly “looked like much” to college football fans, and the NFL game sufficiently intrigued and attracted fans to expand the NFL’s fan base, and to keep the NFL around—defying the expectations of those who believed that the league would fold quickly.

Protective headgear is supposed to … well … protect the head of the person wearing the headgear. But paradoxically—as Ward indicates—it is used to encourage players to issue high-speed, violent hits (oftentimes with their heads). Players are assured that they can afford to issue those hits since they and the players they hit are allegedly protected by strong and sturdy helmets. But it may be that we can protect players better by issuing the kind of headgear the NFL used in its infancy, thus deterring players from making the kinds of hits that lead to concussions. A player is not going to be reckless with his cerebral health—or with that of other players—if he thinks that the helmet he and others are wearing will do a poor job of protecting against violent head traumas.

January 13th, 2013
pejmanyousefzadeh

Your Good News Post of the Day

We won’t be killed by a giant asteroid in 2036.

Among the benefits of avoiding Apophis is that my beloved Chicago Cubs will have more time to win a World Series. And Heaven knows they will need it.

November 29th, 2012
pejmanyousefzadeh

todaysdocument:

Army and Navy Battle for the First Time

On November 29, 1890 the first Army-Navy football game was played at West Point.  The United States Naval Academy defeated the United States Military Academy 24-0.  (And by 1899 they were already talking smack.)

Photograph of some of the action on the field during the Army-Navy football game in Philadelphia, attended by the President and Mrs. Truman. 12/02/1950

In the 1950 game in this photo Navy upset undefeated Army by a score of 14-2.

Reblogged from Today's Document
November 26th, 2012
pejmanyousefzadeh

uchicagomag:

On this date in 1896, UChicago’s Amos Alonzo Stagg invented the huddle.

(Photo courtesy Chicago Maroon/Special Collections Research Center, apf7-01990)

November 23rd, 2012
pejmanyousefzadeh
Reblogged from Lapham's Quarterly

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